Gebug Ende, from Karangasem to Buleleng, A Dance to Invoke Rain

Gebug Ende, from Karangasem to Buleleng, A Dance to Invoke Rain

Various unique and interesting traditions can be found in North Bali. One of them is a tradition characterized by vivacious heroism remaining to exist in the community until these days. The ‘War of Rattan’ or better known as gebug ende can be found at Patas village, Gerokgak subdistrict. Actually, this tradition comes from the lava

Various unique and interesting traditions can be found in North Bali. One of them is a tradition characterized by vivacious heroism remaining to exist in the community until these days. The ‘War of Rattan’ or better known as gebug ende can be found at Patas village, Gerokgak subdistrict. Actually, this tradition comes from the lava land (nickname of Karangasem, precisely from Seraya village).

By and large, this tradition is played when dry season arrives. At that time, people of Seraya have a religious cultural tradition to beg for rain. This tradition is played by two men, where the player hits each other with a rattan whip of two meters long. It is accompanied with a piece of shield with a diameter of 60 cm made of dry cowhide tied to wooden frame. Other than the players, in the arena of the game there are also two people serving as referee or pakembar.

Even though their body is hit by rattan, they are still happy and dance with joy. Meanwhile, the sound of the baleganjur gamelan music is played as a companion to heat up the atmosphere of “the war.” At the same time, the audience keeps cheering to give support to the one on one fight.

This gebug ende attraction is generally performed on the sidelines of breaks in the fields at noon or evening. It is commonly held prior to the planting season in the field. A coach of gebug ende for children Wayan Nadi said that during dry season the tradition is held to appeal to God in order to bring down a rain. “This tradition is habitually held during dry seasons. If the rain late long in the season, gebug ende will be held. Originally this tradition comes from the Seraya village, Karangasem,” he said.

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A senior figure of Patas village, Ketut Koroh, said that if one of the players bleeds due to the blow of rattan stick, there is a possibility to rain. In short, according to the belief of Seraya people, the gebug game is held at this village to appeal to God for rain for the sake of agricultural purposes.

Apparently this tradition is not just to beg for rain. “If something bad happens, this gebug tradition can be held. For example, there is uncontrollable pest attack, this gebug is the repellent. After holding the gebug, by degrees the bad things will disappear and be back to normal as before. Whatever bad things are, if neutralized by this gebug game then it will certainly be destroyed. It is according to public belief,” he said.

This attraction usually takes place in public places by inviting opponents at the village. Gebug game is played by two small children, adults and parents. Amid the current advancement of technology, the gebug tradition having existed in the Bali Aga era is already almost extinct. So, we as the heir of the culture should duly boast and preserve its existence. It is the cultural journey of Gebug Ende from lava land to Panji Sakti land (the nickname of Buleleng district). (BTN/win)



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