Nyambutin Ritual, first time baby’s feet touch the earth

Nyambutin Ritual, first time baby’s feet touch the earth

Balinese Hindus commonly practice a number of different rituals as expressions of gratitude for the graces bestowed upon them by God. The nyambutin series of rituals make up one such ceremony that is conducted with sincerity for babies with the hope of having grace bestowed upon the family. As Jro Mangku Nurata explained, while officiating

Balinese Hindus commonly practice a number of different rituals as expressions of gratitude for the graces bestowed upon them by God. The nyambutin series of rituals make up one such ceremony that is conducted with sincerity for babies with the hope of having grace bestowed upon the family.

As Jro Mangku Nurata explained, while officiating over a tutug kambuhan ritual recently, Nyambutin or nelubulanin (meaning 3 months) ceremonies are held for babies 105 days after they are born which is 3 months according to the Balinese calendar.  God is asked to provide protection for the young human. Part of this ceremony includes giving the baby a name and clarifying the meaning of this name.  Most notably this is the first time that the baby’s feet are allowed to touch the earth.

“According to Hindu tradition, babies are only allowed to have their feet touch the ground once they are three months old as this is when they start being able to sit up by themselves”, explained Jro Mangku.

The Nyambutin, ceremony said Jro Mangku is a way to welcome the baby into the world and show gratitude in a ritual called pangenteg bayu in which water is given to Mother Earth in the hopes that the baby is given a long life. The Nyambutin ceremony is classified as a Manusa Yadnya  (rite of passage) ceremony and is carried out with the hope the baby and their family will be prosperous and have a good life.

The baby’s placenta will usually have been buried in the family yard and it is in this same area that the nyambutin ceremony is held with the baby’s parents actively taking part in all the rituals involved. This ceremony is dedicated to Bhatara Surya (Lord of the Sun), Ibu Pertiwi (Mother Earth) and Bhatara-Bhatari (deities of the household), explained Jero Mangku Nurata. “The aim is to ask that the baby be guided and safeguarded”, he said. (BTN/uma)

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